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    STUDIA CHEMIA - Issue no. 1 / 2011  
         
  Article:   IN DEPTH VARIATION OF WATER PROPERTIES FOR St. ANA LAKE – ROMANIA RELATED TO SEDIMENTS IN SUSPENSION.

Authors:  DUMITRU RISTOIU.
 
       
         
  Abstract:  

The minerals identified in the sand shore and mud from the bottom of St. Ana Lake is: biotite, potassic feldspar, hornblende, potassic muscovite, and hydrate silicate mixed with amorphous andesite. Such mineral particles were observed suspended in the water from an average depth of 2 m to the bottom. The suspended particle average diameter and density increases along with the water depth, which may affect water properties. We found that the electrical conductivity is close to the distilled water in the upper layers and increases to the bottom due to the dissolved mineral ions. The turbidity is very low, at the surface and progressively increases at 4 meter depth, because of the particle density variation in lower water layer. The pH has an acid range. The pH values are slowly decreasing with the water depth due to the acid pH of phylosilicates. The main metal found is Fe, the concentration is considerably below the standard limit. It increases with water depth due to the increased concentration of biotite and hornblende particles floating in the water. There were also identified traces of Zn and Cu in very low concentrations and no traces of Pb and Cd. All measurements performed in July 2010 prove that the St. Ana Lake presents a normal state for a closed water system with no pollution trace.

Keywords: volcanic lake, turbidity, electrical conductivity, pH, heavy metals

 
         
     
         
         
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